Marigolds

October 31, 2008

Tips on Growing Marigolds

Filed under: annuals, flower gardens, flowers, marigolds — Tags: , , , , — patoconnor @ 11:10 am

Tips on Growing Marigolds

                           

Marigolds are incredibly popular not only for their easy-going disposition, but their rapid growth in any sunny spot in your garden or windowsill.

In fact, if you dote over marigolds you may get lush, green growth at the expense of flowers. Their bright orange or yellow blossoms are known to attract butterflies from miles around.

Although science has yet to prove it, the old wive’s tale points to marigolds’ beneficial effects in dispelling common insect pests from the garden.

However, slugs & snails find marigolds extremely tasty and may gobble up an entire crop if left unchecked.

An excellent edging or border plant, marigolds easily tolerate reflected heat from garden walks or pavement, and usually withstand drought conditions without a fuss. Be sure to deadhead marigolds to ensure a longer blooming period throught the growing season …

On the Web – How to plant & grow marigolds :

Questions on Marigolds – Expert responses from a professional horticulturist to common & offbeat questions on growing marigolds including container gardening, spider mite pests, grackle attacks ( ! ), and more…

Marigolds – Facts & information on soil, water & sunlight requirements, planting & growth, with descriptions on several flower varieties.

Backyard Gardener – Marigolds & Pest Control – Good overview describing the flower’s ease of cultivation with sunlight & watering requirements, and its use in pest control & plant diseases.

Marigold – Complete fact sheet with how to’s on sunlight & watering requirements, susceptibility to pests & diseases, description of several varieties including African, French, Irish Lace and tangerine-scented marigolds.

Marigolds: Best Varieties for Butterflies – Along with lots of related marigold lore and history.

All About Marigolds – Feature article from Burpee Seed Co. on growing marigolds from seed, marigold cultivation, related pests & diseases, harvesting & culinary uses.

Pot Marigold (Calendula officinalis) – Brief description and how to’s on growing & propagation, plus more on medicinal & culinary uses with a complete recipe for marigold wine…

Chiff.com                    

HISTORY OF MARIGOLDS

HISTORY OF MARIGOLDS 

                                         

INTRODUCTION                      

Marigolds, native to the New World and sacred flowers of the Aztecs, journeyed across the Atlantic Ocean twice to travel 3,000 miles north of their center of origin. The lengthy journey is a testimony to the rugged durability of marigolds. Today it is one of the most popular annuals grown in North American gardens.

HISTORY

The earliest use of marigolds was by the Aztec people who attributed magical, religious and medicinal properties to marigolds. The first recorded use of marigolds is in the De La Crus-Badiano Aztec Herbal of 1552. The Herbal records the use of marigolds for treatment of hiccups, being struck by lightening, or “for one who wishes to cross a river or water safely”. The last use confirms the magical properties ascribed to marigolds.

The Aztecs bred the marigold for increasingly large blooms. It is told that in the 1500’s, native marigold seeds were taken from the Aztecs by early Spanish explorers to Spain. The marigolds were cultivated in Spain and grown in monastery gardens.

From Spain, marigold seeds were transported to France and northern Africa. The taller marigolds, now called African-American, became naturalized in North Africa.

In Mexico and Latin America, marigold flowers are used to decorate household altars to celebrate Al1 Saints Day and All Souls Day. Flower heads are scattered on relatives graves which can account for the profusion of marigolds in cemeteries.

Marigolds are also used in Hindu religious ceremonies. An account describes the marigold being used as garlands to decorate village gods during the harvest festival. The traveler recalling the festival also noted that maize and peppers were exactly the same shade of orange-yellow as the marigold. It was as though the corn and peppers were selected or bred to match the marigold flower color.

Several hundred years after their initial journey from the Americas to Europe and Africa, marigolds were introduced to American gardeners. This reunion of sorts did not happen until shortly after the Revolutionary War. Marigolds were just one of many plants shipped to the young country.

Around the turn of this century, sweet peas and asters were the popular flowers in the United States. Yet both of them were becoming beleaguered by disease and declining overall performance. The time was right for a new flower to make its debut. In 1915 David Burpee took over the seed company which was founded by his father, W. Atlee Burpee. Young David felt that marigolds held promise and decided to feature them in his catalog and fund research.

          Marigolds are also used in Hindu religious ceremonies. An account describes the marigold being used as garlands to decorate village gods during the harvest festival. The traveler recalling the festival also noted that maize and peppers were exactly the same shade of orange-yellow as the marigold. It was as though the corn and peppers were selected or bred to match the marigold flower color.

Several hundred years after their initial journey from the Americas to Europe and Africa, marigolds were introduced to American gardeners. This reunion of sorts did not happen until shortly after the Revolutionary War. Marigolds were just one of many plants shipped to the young country.

Around the turn of this century, sweet peas and asters were the popular flowers in the United States. Yet both of them were becoming beleaguered by disease and declining overall performance. The time was right for a new flower to make its debut. In 1915 David Burpee took over the seed company which was founded by his father, W. Atlee Burpee. Young David felt that marigolds held promise and decided to feature them in his catalog and fund research. 

Since the 1920 s marigold breeding has developed hundreds of new varieties. The odorless marigolds, white marigolds, hybrids and triploids have all been advancements in breeding. Somehow it seems fitting that the marigold would find the breeding emphasis and popularity back in the Americas, its center of origin.

 Burpee’s         

See all of Burpee’s Marigold selection

Garden Tools for Marigolds

Filed under: annuals, flower gardens, flowers, marigolds — Tags: , , , , , , , — patoconnor @ 10:58 am

Garden Tools for Marigolds           

You will also need a small selection of garden tools for your flower bed.  This is one area that I don’t believe in buying these cheap, flimsy tools.  You save more money in the long run by purchasing tools that are sturdy and of superior quality.

Your tools should include the usual large ones, plus a set of the smaller hand varieties.  I find both come in quite handy and each has a particular use at a particular time.

                                               

Garden Tools ~ quality gardening tools are a good investment

Now you can have the benefits of working with garden tools designed for professionals. Heavy duty, high-grade materials used in gardening tools for landscapers, arborists and professional gardeners mean your tools will last longer and perform better.

Good quality garden tools are a wise investment for all gardeners from novices to master gardeners. With proper care and maintenance your garden tools will last a long time, if not a lifetime. Start with the basic gardening tools and build your collection as you gain experience and as your garden grows.

Basic garden tool set:
  • spading fork
  • round-end shovel
  • rake
  • garden shears or pruners
  • hoe                                         

                                                                    Gardening Trends

Before digging into the garden make sure you have the right tools

Digging around in your garden is not exactly brain surgery, but like surgeons, every gardener should have the right tool for the right job.

Some may say that a shovel is just a shovel, but an expert in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences points out that real gardeners need a spade — and about four other essential gardening implements.  

“These days there are catalogs and stores with very specialized equipment, but many gardeners really just need some basic tools,” says J. Robert Nuss, professor of ornamental horticulture. “Once you have a solid set of tools, then you can branch out into specialty equipment.”

Nuss recommends five basic tools:

A long-handled spade. This tool is designed for digging. The blade is straight and set at an angle so it cuts easily into the soil. “A spade is not a shovel,” Nuss explains. “A shovel is designed like a scoop and is used to move material from one place to another.”        

A spading fork. This tool has flat, square tines and is used for moving heavy soil. “Spading forks are invaluable for preparing soil in the spring and harvesting some types of vegetables in the fall,” Nuss says. “Don’t confuse it with a pitchfork, which has rounded, slender tines and is used to move straw or compost.” – see other side    

A steel rake.These large rakes are used to break up clay, to smooth out soil and to rake in fertilizers. “If the garden is large, get a wide, heavy rake,” Nuss says. “It wouldn’t hurt to have a wide leaf rake for lawn work.”    

A hoe. Hoes are used to form rows, cover seeds, move soil, cut out weeds and make holes for planting seedlings. “Hoes come in all types and sizes, but most gardeners don’t need heavy ones,” Nuss says. “The most versatile hoes are dual-purpose models, with a triangular cutting head on one side and a cultivating tool with three tines on the other side.”    

A hand trowel. Any hand tool that makes gardening more efficient is an invaluable addition to the homeowner’s arsenal of tools. “Hand tools are best for marking rows, weeding, making furrows and moving small plants,” Nuss says.            

Nuss says when it comes to gardening, choosing a big tool isn’t necessarily better. “Heavy tools are fine for big people, but if you are short on size or energy, pick smaller tools,” he explains. “The same logic applies to picking the best handle length. Tools are extensions of the body and should be used for extra leverage or reach when pulling or cutting.”

Nuss advises using heavy-handled tools for moving soil and heavy material. For weeding and cultivation jobs, he recommends using a tool with a lightweight handle.

 

Old House Web                           

** I also highly recommend a good pair of garden gloves as well **

Basic Supplies for Growing Marigolds

Basic Supplies for Growing Marigolds 

 

Before we get started learning all about growing marigolds, you should know there are a few basic supplies you should have on hand:

1. ) Lots and Lots of cow manure.  You can buy the non-smelly composted bags, 40 lbs worth for a buck at most large gardening supply centers.  I have always found this essential to improve the soil and maintain its health.  It is also important in attracting earthworms, which are vital to a rich, soft soil. 

 
2.) Miracle grow – or any type of good bloom booster fertilizer.  You won’t believe the number of flowers you will have using these products.  When you read the package look for the numbers 15-30-15 on the front of the package.  The product is easy to use as well.  Simply fill your sprayer canister with the crystals and apply with a water hose.  You will also be able to find store brands or less known brands that are just as good.  Simply be sure of those 15-30-15 readings.
 
 
3.) Beer – should be ice cold and refreshing.  No, no….now this isn’t for the slugs.  I have always heard this will atract them and they drown while drinking it.   Now that is a waste of good brew and is reserved for the gardener.
 
 
4.) Good, comfy yard chair/lounge.  You’ll need one of these for those rest breaks when you sip your beer and admire your handy work.
 
 

Welcome to Marvelous Marigolds!

Filed under: annuals, flower gardens, flowers, marigolds — Tags: , , , , — patoconnor @ 12:38 am

  Welcome to MARIGOLDS  

Since I now have my “Zany for Zinnias” blog up and running, I am starting my second flower blog.

I have some thirty-six other internet sites on prose, inspirational writings and medical conditions.  But, I needed a change and what a better idea could there be then starting some blogs on my favorite flowers and ideas on gardening.

Marigolds are native to the Western hemisphere and are as American as apple pie.  They are easy to grow, provide an abundant reward in beauty and in attracting butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden and are simply fantastic for cut flower bouquets. Infact, the more you cut them, the more flowers you have.  They also come in varieties small enough for beautiful borders or tall enough to provide incredible background color for other flowers.

So enjoy!

            

                               Pat O’Connor  

                                      01/29/2007

                                   This replaces our previous blog located on AOL, which closed down its blog operations.  

Pat 

October 31, 2008
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